AFTRS LAUNCHES BLACK SHOT TALENT LAB TO DEVELOP NEXT GENERATION OF INDIGENOUS CINEMATOGRAPHERS

BLACK SHOT, a lab intensive for emerging Indigenous cinematographers, is underway at AFTRS this week.

AFTRS has invited nine Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cinematographers to participate in BLACK SHOT – two from Alice Springs, one from Broome, one from Perth, one from Townsville, one from Brisbane, one from Sydney and two from Yirrkala in the Northern Territory. Three of those selected are women.

“The workshop aims to develop the cinematography skills of emerging Indigenous cinematographers who have demonstrated ability and willingness to pursue opportunities to develop their craft,” said Kyas Sherriff, Head of the AFTRS Indigenous Unit.

As well as the five-day intensive, which is being facilitated by renowned Indigenous cinematographer and AFTRS alumni Allan Collins ACS, AFTRS is partnering with the industry to arrange the opportunity for placements and mentorships for participants.

“The AFTRS Indigenous Unit wants to create a pathway for cinematographers to get deeper into their craft and art with strategic mentoring and skills training. In the workshop they will learn core craft skills of cinematography including operating commercial cameras, lensing and exploring depth of field for storytelling and visual language as well as on set cultural practices,” Ms Sherriff said.

“This talent lab is designed to embed craft and inspire the next wave of Indigenous cinematographers. It’s 20 years since Warwick Thornton, Allan Collins, Jason Ramp and Murray Lui trained here at AFTRS and our most recent graduate was Cornel Ozzies in 2011.  We want to proactively develop the next generation of Indigenous cinematographers. I am very pleased to say that we have one Indigenous student studying cinematography this year and I hope that BLACK SHOT will inspire others to join him.” Ms Sherriff said.

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